Self-driving, driver-assist technology linked to hundreds of car crashes – Reuters

The data was collected as part of an order issued by NHTSA a year ago that required automakers to report crashes involving cars equipped with advanced driver assistance systems, also known as ADAS or level 2 automated driving systems.

The order was prompted in part by crashes and deaths over the past six years that involved Teslas operating on autopilot. Last week, NHTSA expanded an investigation to determine if the Autopilot has technological and design flaws that pose safety risks. The agency has investigated 35 crashes that occurred while Autopilot was on, including nine that have resulted in the deaths of 14 people since 2014. It had also opened a preliminary investigation into 16 incidents in which Teslas were on Autopilot. crashed into emergency vehicles that had pulled over and flashed their lights.

As part of the order issued last year, NHTSA also collected data on crashes or incidents involving fully automated vehicles that are mostly still in development but are being tested on public roads. Manufacturers of these vehicles include GM, Ford and other traditional automakers as well as technology companies such as Waymo, which is owned by Google’s parent company.

These types of vehicles have been involved in 130 incidents, according to NHTSA. One resulted in a serious injury, 15 minor or moderate injuries and 108 resulted in no injury. Many crashes involving automated vehicles have resulted in fender bending or bumper banging, as they are primarily used at low speeds and in city driving.

Waymo, which runs a fleet of driverless taxis in Arizona, was part of 62 incidents. GM’s Cruise division, which just started offering driverless taxi rides in San Francisco, was involved in 23 minor crashes involving an automated test vehicle made by start-up Pony.ai. resulted in the recall of three of the company’s test vehicles. vehicles to correct the software.

NHTSA’s order was an unusually bold step for the regulator, which has been criticized in recent years for not being more assertive with automakers.

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